The Moment You Give Makes a Lasting Impact | Vanderbilt Health Stories of Impact

The Moment You Give Makes a Lasting Impact | Vanderbilt Health Stories of Impact


(piano music) – I received a phone call
in February the 28th, 2013. And I found myself in a
place that I’ve never been. I was gripped with fear
to the point of not being able to breathe. – I was scared out of my mind. I was not prepared for it by any means because in my mind, my son was fine, there was no reason to
think any further about it. – Kidney disease usually
affects you later in life. And so in my 40s, I
started showing dysfunction such that I probably needed
to be seen by a nephrologist. – My primary care physician
told me that I had peritoneal carcinomatosis. They gave me a six to nine
months with chemotherapy or not, depending on how long I would live and whether the chemo would
kill me before the cancer would. – What do you say when
your husband tells you he has terminal cancer. – I was rather vocal about,
there’s got to be something you can do with this 53-year
old, hopefully somewhat in shape body. We came back to
Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and met with Dr. Kamran Idrees. He showed me the cancer
that was encompassing about eight different organs. – I was recruited here to
build a high pec program which is essentially
a heated chemo bath in the abdominal cavity for these cancers and we thought that he
would be a good candidate for that procedure. – He removed my spleen, my
gallbladder, my omentum, four or five feet of my small intestine, three or four feet of my large intestine, and my appendix, what was left. – [Lametra] Ricky is six years old, he was born with sickle-cell disease. – Sickle-cell disease is
an inherited blood disorder that impacts the red blood cells. They can have a stroke, like
you see older people having even in their toddler years. – At one point I asked him,
what did his pain feel like. He said it felt like a jackhammer. So at that point in time,
I knew that the pain was really, really bad. There are a lot of things
that go into taking care of a child who has sickle-cell disease. So not only do you have to
make sure that you keep your doctor’s appointments,
make sure that your child is taking their medications,
but it’s just a day to day things. In terms of a child wanting to be a child. So I really appreciate Dr.
Devan and Ms. Jeannie being here just to walk us through
those day to day things. I am amazed at how Ms.
Jeannie is able to remember everybody’s name. There are a lot of children that they see and yet she knows each
and every one of them as if they were her own. – Seven years ago, I
received a renal transplant at Vanderbilt Medical Center. I got a call at 8:30 at
night from Dr. Langone and said can you get to
Vanderbilt in three hours and I said yes, and he said
it’s in your perfect match, don’t have a wreck. – I can tell you sometimes
when you call someone at 4 o’clock in the morning,
not always in the best mood or anything like that, but
specifically with Mr. Hill, I can hear the hope in
his voice when he said he would come on in. – I noticed how people really
work together at Vanderbilt as a team. But the teamwork at Vanderbilt carried on from the operating room. – Everybody working together. If we ever had a problem,
all we had to do was pick up the phone and call. – He did well, I mean
there was really no hiccups with his surgery or his follow-ups since. – Everyone is so polite and so courteous and so concerned about
your well-being and welfare and I feel that both my
family and I are in really good hands with Vanderbilt. – [Ron] Vanderbilt-Ingram
Cancer Center has been a huge beacon of hope to me. – [Jill] On our last
appointment, with Dr. Idrees when he actually said the
words, go live your life, saying that Ronnie was cancer free, Ronnie asked, well what can we do. He said we want to give
back, and Dr. Idrees said we need money, we
need money for research. We need money to make
this treatment better. – We feel by donating and
giving funds and raising funds, if we’re part of the solution, and we can ever even feel in our hearts that we helped, what else is there. – I would encourage you
to donate simply because one day this could be
somebody that you know. It can impact your life in such a way that you would have never imagined. Today, I feel more
empowered, more educated, so that I can go out and
I can teach other people about sickle-cell disease,
to provide them with a sense of comfort. This is not the end, this
is only the beginning. – The moment I found out that
I was going to be receiving a kidney transplant,
I felt totally blessed because it would improve
the quality of my life. We decided that we should
figure out some way that we can pay this gift forward and one of the ways that
we thought we would do this is through an estate
planning with renal research in mind. A feel fairly good that Sue
and I are a very small part of the transplant team. So maybe this gift will
help others down the road. You can join the Vanderbilt
health team by giving today. – The moment you give,
makes a lasting impact. – Thank you. (inspirational music)

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