Mike Maguire and Andre Yeung on the Community Pharmacist Consultation Service

Mike Maguire and Andre Yeung on the Community Pharmacist Consultation Service


C+D: Hi guys, what advice for pharmacists
do you have for those who want to implement CPCS successfully? Yeung: So I guess the advice we’d give to
pharmacists is it’s about understanding what happens in 111 and understanding the types
of patients that you’re going to get sent through, so I guess for me it’s about remembering
that it’s not just about solving the problems that come your way, you’re gonna get some
patients that you can definitely manage in a community pharmacy sent through as part
of NHS CPCS, you’re gonna have some people that you definitely need to escalate to another
location, so for example a GP practice, but then there’s a group of people in the middle
where they actually need a bit of management, a bit of safety-netting, they need some advice,
and actually they can always come back to see the pharmacist if things don’t get better
or if they get worse. So for me, it’s about understanding the three segments there, it
isn’t just about solving every problem that is sent to you by NHS 111. It’s about escalation,
it’s about managing that patient, and giving them all the advice they need to, you know,
finish their consultation successfully. Maguire: The other thing that’s really important
for pharmacists to consider is to put themselves in the shoes of the call handlers at NHS 111
and we’ve got to bear in mind that the call handlers aren’t clinically trained, and also
they’re really working blind, because all they’re doing with a patient is speaking to
them on the telephone, whereas the advantage we have in our community pharmacy consultation
room is that we can actually see the patient, so sometimes the call handler will send a
patient across to the pharmacy and a pharmacist will think “well, why have they sent this
patient?” but it’s because the pharmacist is ideally located and positioned with all
their clinical expertise that the community pharmacist has, and also they can see the
patient, that gives them the advantage. Yeung: Is the £14 fee appropriate, is it
the right level? Well it’s the level we’ve agreed at, and actually it’s the level that,
you know, it feels right. It feels right. It’s the same as the NUMSAS was, it was the
same as the fee for DMIRS, but actually for us I guess it’s not really the most important
question right now. This is a service that could open the door on the future for community
pharmacy, a new, clinical future. And I guess there’s more stuff that is gonna come through
this route in the future. So it’s going to become more important. So for us it’s less
about the fee that is paid today and it’s more about the future and what this could
mean for the sector, so if later on for example we get
more conditions through this route, we could get PGDs to give out nitrofurantoin for treating UTIs,
for example, that’s a lot of referrals that could come through this route. Maguire: Well actually, it’s working really,
really well in the North East. The services that community pharmacists and the locums
coming in are providing in all the community pharmacies is absolutely off the scale, they’re
brilliant, they’re doing really, really well.

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