Heather Barnett: What humans can learn from semi-intelligent slime

Heather Barnett: What humans can learn from semi-intelligent slime


I’d like to introduce you to an organism: a slime mold, Physarum polycephalum. It’s a mold with an identity
crisis, because it’s not a mold, so let’s get that straight to start with. It is one of 700 known slime molds belonging to the kingdom of the amoeba. It is a single-celled organism, a cell, that joins together with other cells to form a mass super-cell to maximize its resources. So within a slime mold you might find thousands or millions of nuclei, all sharing a cell wall, all operating as one entity. In its natural habitat, you might find the slime mold foraging in woodlands, eating rotting vegetation, but you might equally find it in research laboratories, classrooms, and even artists’ studios. I first came across the slime
mold about five years ago. A microbiologist friend of mine gave me a petri dish with a little yellow blob in it and told me to go home and play with it. The only instructions I was given, that it likes it dark and damp and its favorite food is porridge oats. I’m an artist who’s worked for many years with biology, with scientific processes, so living material is not uncommon for me. I’ve worked with plants, bacteria, cuttlefish, fruit flies. So I was keen to get my new collaborator home to see what it could do. So I took it home and I watched. I fed it a varied diet. I observed as it networked. It formed a connection between food sources. I watched it leave a trail behind it, indicating where it had been. And I noticed that when it was
fed up with one petri dish, it would escape and find a better home. I captured my observations through time-lapse photography. Slime mold grows at about one centimeter an hour, so it’s not really ideal for live viewing unless there’s some form of
really extreme meditation, but through the time lapse, I could observe some really interesting behaviors. For instance, having fed on a nice pile of oats, the slime mold goes off to explore new territories in different directions simultaneously. When it meets itself, it knows it’s already there, it recognizes it’s there, and instead retreats back and grows in other directions. I was quite impressed by this feat, at how what was essentially
just a bag of cellular slime could somehow map its territory, know itself, and move with seeming intention. I found countless scientific studies, research papers, journal articles, all citing incredible work with this one organism, and I’m going to share a few of those with you. For example, a team in Hokkaido University in Japan filled a maze with slime mold. It joined together and formed a mass cell. They introduced food at two points, oats of course, and it formed a connection between the food. It retracted from empty areas and dead ends. There are four possible routes through this maze, yet time and time again, the slime mold established the shortest and the most efficient route. Quite clever. The conclusion from their experiment was that the slime mold had
a primitive form of intelligence. Another study exposed cold air at
regular intervals to the slime mold. It didn’t like it. It doesn’t like it cold. It doesn’t like it dry. They did this at repeat intervals, and each time, the slime mold slowed down its growth in response. However, at the next interval, the researchers didn’t put the cold air on, yet the slime mold slowed down in anticipation of it happening. It somehow knew that it was about the time for the cold air that it didn’t like. The conclusion from their experiment was that the slime mold was able to learn. A third experiment: the slime mold was invited to explore a territory covered in oats. It fans out in a branching pattern. As it goes, each food node it finds, it forms a network, a connection to, and keeps foraging. After 26 hours, it established quite a firm network between the different oats. Now there’s nothing remarkable in this until you learn that the center oat that it started from represents the city of Tokyo, and the surrounding oats are
suburban railway stations. The slime mold had replicated the Tokyo transport network — (Laughter) — a complex system developed over time by community dwellings, civil
engineering, urban planning. What had taken us well over 100 years took the slime mold just over a day. The conclusion from their experiment was that the slime mold can form efficient networks and solve the traveling salesman problem. It is a biological computer. As such, it has been mathematically modeled, algorithmically analyzed. It’s been sonified, replicated, simulated. World over, teams of researchers are decoding its biological principles to understand its computational rules and applying that learning
to the fields of electronics, programming and robotics. So the question is, how does this thing work? It doesn’t have a central nervous system. It doesn’t have a brain, yet it can perform behaviors that we associate with brain function. It can learn, it can remember, it can solve problems, it can make decisions. So where does that intelligence lie? So this is a microscopy, a video I shot, and it’s about 100 times magnification, sped up about 20 times, and inside the slime mold, there is a rhythmic pulsing flow, a vein-like structure carrying cellular material, nutrients and chemical information through the cell, streaming first in one direction
and then back in another. And it is this continuous, synchronous oscillation within the cell that allows it to form quite a complex understanding of its environment, but without any large-scale control center. This is where its intelligence lies. So it’s not just academic researchers in universities that are interested in this organism. A few years ago, I set up SliMoCo, the Slime Mould Collective. It’s an online, open, democratic network for slime mold researchers and enthusiasts to share knowledge and experimentation across disciplinary divides and across academic divides. The Slime Mould Collective
membership is self-selecting. People have found the collective as the slime mold finds the oats. And it comprises of scientists and computer scientists and researchers but also artists like me, architects, designers, writers, activists, you name it. It’s a very interesting, eclectic membership. Just a few examples: an artist who paints with fluorescent Physarum; a collaborative team who are combining biological and electronic design with 3D printing technologies in a workshop; another artist who is using the slime mold as a way of engaging a community to map their area. Here, the slime mold is being used directly as a biological tool, but metaphorically as a symbol for ways of talking about social cohesion, communication and cooperation. Other public engagement activities, I run lots of slime mold workshops, a creative way of engaging with the organism. So people are invited to come and learn about what amazing things it can do, and they design their own petri dish experiment, an environment for the slime mold to navigate so they can test its properties. Everybody takes home a new pet and is invited to post their results on the Slime Mould Collective. And the collective has enabled me to form collaborations with a whole array of interesting people. I’ve been working with filmmakers on a feature-length slime mold documentary, and I stress feature-length, which is in the final stages of edit and will be hitting your cinema screens very soon. (Laughter) It’s also enabled me to conduct what I think is the world’s first human slime mold experiment. This is part of an exhibition in Rotterdam last year. We invited people to become
slime mold for half an hour. So we essentially tied people together so they were a giant cell, and invited them to follow slime mold rules. You have to communicate through oscillations, no speaking. You have to operate as one entity, one mass cell, no egos, and the motivation for moving and then exploring the environment is in search of food. So a chaotic shuffle ensued
as this bunch of strangers tied together with yellow ropes
wearing “Being Slime Mold” t-shirts wandered through the museum park. When they met trees, they had to reshape their connections and reform as a mass cell through not speaking. This is a ludicrous experiment in many, many ways. This isn’t hypothesis-driven. We’re not trying to prove, demonstrate anything. But what it did provide us was a way of engaging a broad section of the public with ideas of intelligence, agency, autonomy, and provide a playful platform for discussions about the things that ensued. One of the most exciting things about this experiment was the conversation that happened afterwards. An entirely spontaneous symposium
happened in the park. People talked about the human psychology, of how difficult it was to let go of their individual personalities and egos. Other people talked about bacterial communication. Each person brought in their own individual interpretation, and our conclusion from this experiment was that the people of Rotterdam were highly cooperative, especially when given beer. We didn’t just give them oats. We gave them beer as well. But they weren’t as efficient as the slime mold, and the slime mold, for me, is a fascinating subject matter. It’s biologically fascinating, it’s computationally interesting, but it’s also a symbol, a way of engaging with ideas of community, collective behavior, cooperation. A lot of my work draws on the scientific research, so this pays homage to the maze experiment but in a different way. And the slime mold is also my working material. It’s a coproducer of photographs, prints, animations, participatory events. Whilst the slime mold doesn’t choose to work with me, exactly, it is a collaboration of sorts. I can predict certain behaviors by understanding how it operates, but I can’t control it. The slime mold has the final say in the creative process. And after all, it has its own internal aesthetics. These branching patterns that we see we see across all forms, scales of nature, from river deltas to lightning strikes, from our own blood vessels to neural networks. There’s clearly significant rules at play in this simple yet complex organism, and no matter what our disciplinary
perspective or our mode of inquiry, there’s a great deal that we can learn from observing and engaging with this beautiful, brainless blob. I give you Physarum polycephalum. Thank you. (Applause)

100 Comments

  • DorsetMushroomHunter says:

    it is purely the illusion of intelligence

  • Zheng Li says:

    it must obey an underlying principle!

  • Kim HQ Jin says:

    well i'm not good at biology but can we imagine it not as a group me people but as a group of some organic stuff in our brain and they honestly cooperate together perfectly every day?

  • Ros Shackleton says:

    Fascinating organism – thanks for sharing!

  • dumbcreaknuller says:

    each cell talk to each other like indivuduals in a hive. the cells comunicate with each other collectivly. their ancestor the eukaryotic cells was the ancestor of the networked cells. the eukaryotic cells was much like us disorganized invidualized individuals that didn't comunicate to well, but over time cells like the eukaryotic cells started to grow in a network and improved comunication. the cell itself is made of molecular machines that comuncate with each other like the network in a sense but the rules are more strict and confined. the real algoritm of life exist inside the cell itself where rules like the one we write in a computer are a necessity to make the clockwork of the cogs and gearsin the cell work.

  • The Hoopsters says:

    we've not managed to get slime to work yet. What is the secret?

  • Memboi says:

    FOR THE FLOOD

  • Sam Reads says:

    Mind blown. Stuff like this makes me want to go back to school and this time, actually learn something.

    The pokemon generation doesn't know how lucky they are to be young and living in today's information rich era.

  • Skape Arts says:

    21 Savage brought me here, have you ever seen i slime? I have

  • SHON3Nknife says:

    Fk, this is beyond amazing.

  • Rob Koch says:

    Why does the mold strengthen pathways for sending nutrients back to the "core". Does fungus have a centralized stomach the nutrients need to reach?

  • Scapegoat says:

    am I the only one not impressed with the Tokyo system replication? it's kind of obvious, if you understand it's optimizing paths to food sources… it's not like the railway system is totally random either

  • Suzy Siviter says:

    It must use Hydrophobic and/or Hydrophilic parts in its cell to resonate the flow, not sure how it would create these timed pulses though, also she mentioned the slime being 'aware' of the cold air fans, if it predicted time; well that would be pretty amazing. Maybe the events/pulses are governed by rate of cell-growth?
    Imagine if we could use more than one type of slime that didnt mix, we could then design complex PCB's automatically, or find a medium the slime could grow in all dimensions and wire up very complex 3d maps.
    Or what about electrically conductive slime we could use to generate circuits by just printing the nodes, the applications here are fascinating.

  • alan toffler says:

    She sounds like Ricky Gervais…

  • easy says:

    we're fucked.

  • Elian Tonietti says:

    scary

  • John Kotis says:

    Do you people want The Blob? Cuz that's how you get The Blob.

  • Deadsy Padilla says:

    Came here from Joe Rogan..this is stupid..there's intelligent study on this,

  • Deadsy Padilla says:

    Hate the voice, block the channel

  • Popi says:

    OMG THIS MOHO IS THE FUTURE OF ARTIFICIAL INTELIGIENCE

  • sarah says:

    so we've found the ancestors to slime girls

  • harikrishnan menon says:

    slime mold evolved into VENOM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • wat da fock says:

    this is not intelligence!

  • MrChangCJ says:

    for the tokyo example, isnt the straight line path the most efficient? I do not believe it can model the rail system. What about elevation, terrain and other considerations a real city has to face?

  • Maria Samaniego says:

    X favor en español gracias

  • The Regret Man says:

    To operate as a group, if each individual cell had brains it would be chaos. The only reason they can do what they do is because of the lack of it

  • Justin Tackett says:

    Where she goes wrong: is taking this amazing biological masterpiece and attributing human characteristics to it. Thats the problem with us humans, we don't care to understand anything outside of our realm of thought and experience.

  • Manny X says:

    So communism only works in nature eh?

  • Peter Smythe says:

    Connect one end to rows of pixels representing an image.
    Connect the other end to a bunch of potential reward sources representing image tags.
    Train it to classify the images correctly.
    Then compare to ANNs to see which is more capable.

  • Valerie W says:

    4:40 wouldn't this have more to do with the pattern in which the oats were spread?

  • Buzz Hammond says:

    What a load of over-simplified rubbish.

  • vincent stowell says:

    All life forms react to stimuli in their environment. The fact that the chemical signals sent within and among cells – and in fact all particles and the energy they carry – can be thought of as informational is well known throughout the scientific community.

    The fact that slime molds succeed in maneuvering through their environment in response to the stimuli of food, moisture, temperature, and their own chemical signals does not warrant the classification of the organism as 'intelligent' in the way that the term would be used to discriminate between biological phenomena in general. In fact these are some of the most basic facets that separate living from non-living matter; all organisms do this.

  • woloabel says:

    Fractionization has many applications for it allows reasonable resource utilization in the process of being alive. Space exploration has employed similar conportment inherently. An umbilical chord, earth, space module, etc, allows further exploration until a goal is reached space or the moon as an example. The building of a civilization that collects the totality of a star's energy output will do the same as the slime mold allocates food. It is just so natural. Mathematicians get to understand this by numbers and pures formulas while the mold can not however….lol

  • 1 1 says:

    3:24 the shortest route is reinforced by the nutrients from the food, thus it stays. Is that intelligence? If every single cell has the simple "program" to tend to go where the nutrients are most heavily transported and shared between the cells, the whole bunch should show the characteristic of congregating towards the shortest route. My guess.

  • 1 1 says:

    4:38 The two nodes at the upper left corner, there's a route that extends from the left node and it goes west a little bit before it goes southeast, which is not necessary, because there's NOT another node on the west of that node.. the cells should have corrected that they didn't, indicating that they have only "individual" intelligence not "collective" intelligence maybe?

  • 1 1 says:

    3:47 I do believe that since there's day and night and it's always 24 hours, the living cells that have been living on earth for who knows how long do have some sort of internal "clock" mechanism in them.. it's why there's SA Node in our hearts that regulates heartbeats. How do cells feel and sense time intervals and control themselves according to time intervals? I don't know. But they do.

  • 1 1 says:

    Also I feel that this spreading around until finding the shortest and optimal routes is kind of similar to Monte Carlo algorithm that can be applied to playing chess. You randomly test many routes by having the computer play against itself very fast, then you select the optimal route. So the cells firstly form a route web, then simplify it to a simple route web. It's complicated but each single cell doesn't need to react to cells beyond its vicinity. If you pour a cup of small steel balls to an area with a couple of magnetic solids, I guess the small balls will go everywhere at the very beginning but will quickly form the most efficient routes connecting the magnetic solids according to the magnetic fields between them.

  • John Frost says:

    excellent info but the mouth nouse is too much for me.

  • 핫쏘스 says:

    sooooooooooo coooooooooooooooooool

  • Marisa IJpelaar says:

    Can you eat this

  • CaveGame says:

    ur just copying smaller original creators

  • Chronic Degenerate says:

    Plants are intelligent I guess.They grow towards the sun if it is blocked out for a long amount of time.Or maybe these alien molds are just regular organisms.

  • Alexander Reid says:

    something Jiymobolical has escaped from swamp, we have to find one friend each for the ground-up movement GCC https://globalchallengescollaboration.org

  • Jose Rejas Gavidia says:

    y el subtitulo? :c

  • TubeSpoker says:

    Paul Stamets brought me here !

  • TubeSpoker says:

    9:00 "no speaking" … but they speak in their way … that´s completely wrong , a human view over comunication of different specie .

  • disha chakraborty says:

    About mapping the Tokyo rail network part I've got a question.What if the slime mould mapped it out not completely on its own but due to the strategic positioning of the oat bits? I mean the oat bits may have been purposefully place in positions of rail stations, knowing that the mould would branch that way…I don't know, maybe?

  • FIJN MAN says:

    The people of Rotterdam were highly cooperative, especially when given beer. Haha that's too true!

  • Na Spokojnie says:

    Where can I buy this slime?

  • Na Spokojnie says:

    Thank you God for this knowledge, what a beautifull world

  • Vídeos de ecologia says:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKt4kqDN9JE

  • Muscle Man says:

    I'd love a pet

  • Muscle Man says:

    So we are really just slime in badass biosuits?

  • Muscle Man says:

    We are really the slime and our body is the matrix

  • Muscle Man says:

    The beginning of VENOM!

  • Живомир Васиљевић says:

    Слузаве плесни у потрази за храном су упоређене са Токијском железницом.Што је апсурдно.Мишљења сам да се слузи шире у потрази за енергијом(мој физичарски приступ).Својом мрежом гранања слузаве плесни највише подсећају на НЕУРОНСКУ МРЕЖУ-гомилање ме подсећа на чворове(СИНАПСЕ).Зашто сам тог уверења?Уверења сам да је то ширење подстакнутом потрагом за храном(енергијом)а мрежа им служи за транспорт енергије до центара(зар то није случај и са људским организмом,МОЗГОМ).Ако посматрамо мозак као централни орган нервног система човека и многих живих бића(животиња и биљака) је највећи потрошач енергије а мрежа неурона распрострањена до најситнијих делова нашег организма има основни задатак да централни нервни систем снабде енергијом а енергија се крвљу транспортује до свих ћелија живог организма ту се у митохондријама нерви снабдевају енергијом и шаљу информацију централном нервном систему да је све или није у реду.Они делови нашег тела у којима је проста размена материје не изискују мрежу нерава(срце,плућа,..) али зато ОРГАНИ КОЈИ ПОСЕДУЈУ НЕРВЕ СУ ЗАПРАВО МЕСТА(ЛОКАЦИЈЕ) У КОЈИМА ДОЛАЗИ ДО ПРЕОБРАЖАЈА МАТЕРИЈЕ У ЕНЕРГИЈУ-као извора енергије нашег мозга(ЦЕНТРАЛНОГ НЕРВНОГ СИСТЕМА).

  • Jose Baez says:

    Incredible

  • HeyCrabman14 says:

    That's some smart slime like in Ghostbusters 2!

  • Filip Lazz says:

    they classically conditioned slime mold!!! mind blown

  • j b says:

    It was going good till. People started to act like idiots pretending to be mold

  • الأماني البيضاء says:

    يا جماعه اريد ترجمته بالعربي لان اريد اسوي بحث عليه بس مو قويه بالانجليزي شسوي نصحوني

  • -D -C says:

    Is it edible, can I eat it, will it make me more intelligent, I need help their
    or should I just stick too magic mushrooms.

  • Brittany W. says:

    Oooo guys….maybe this is how the first single celled organisms and bacteria first evolved into complex organisms on our planet….oooo

  • Eni Ekukole says:

    0:14 it was a little be weird I correctly guessed the gender of speaker from the title of the video

  • Boxcarcifer says:

    Slime Mold Project is similar German Film 'Human The Human Centipede (First Sequence)R 2009 ‧ Slasher/Thriller ‧ 1h 32m

  • Rique says:

    Gravemind.

  • Celluloid Heros. says:

    i’ve heard that a lot of people have had similar thought processes towards cellular intelligence while tripping. does anyone know anything more about this?

  • Maciej Ratajczak says:

    5:29– How does this thing work? Simple- it doesn't need a central nervous system, it doesn't need a brain. Our individual human autonomy is just an illusion because we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, making us merely the imagination of ourselves. Physarum polycephalum can learn, it can remember, it can solve problems and can make decisions by uploading information into the cosmic overmind- this process is called morphic resonance. Great video, very interesting, Thank you.

  • bmoe sucka says:

    thithis will be the future of a.i and robots this will be the foundation for neropathways in their brains.

  • Jason H. says:

    6:51 lmao the poor lady

  • Johne Hanthony says:

    This has nothing to do with the Travelling salesman problem…

  • Shel B says:

    Hopefully the humans in the experiment weren't cut up into little bits for research.

  • elizabluekitty says:

    I don't know why I'm only just stumbling across this, but as a civil engineer I can't imagine using this slime to create the most efficient transportation system then have to stand in front of the communities impacted by the route and defend the design… just imagine that public hearing: "the slime told me to do it!"

  • Batman says:

    Feed it a human brain. See if it gets any smarter.

  • Abdullah Al Mamun says:

    Good has indicated such miracles of His creation in Chapter 2 of Verse 26…. "Indeed, Lord (Allah) is not ashamed to set forth an example (like) even (of) a mosquito and (even) something smaller than it. Then as for those who believed, [thus] they will know that it (is) the truth from their Lord. And as for those who disbelieved [thus] they will say what (did) intend Allah by this example? He lets go astray by it many and He guides by it many. And not He lets go astray by it except the defiantly disobedient."….. Such miracles are easy for God

  • Dorothy N. says:

    (Coming into a thread doubtless long entirely dead but, what the heck!) This particular collective (assuming this one to still be in existence) sounds incredible in a number of ways and I must say that I'm extremely impressed, in yet another number of ways, lol! (Not that I feel that we should want to 'let go' of our individual selves to become some sort of collective Borg. Slime mold and more complex life has obviously evolved differently and has different survival characteristics, needs and capabilities resulting from this.) I also hope that this collective effort toward at least the attempt at understanding this life-form will in some manner affect and help direct general society in counteracting the peculiar notion being propagated by some that tech tools are somehow 'better than life and intended to replace it', when we (ideally) create tools (including complex ones) to make life better – at least the saner among us do. While others prefer to weaponize everything, to therefore hazard everything. But what we 'see', we each interpret in our own individual/as officially-accepted and authoritatively-stated fashions – which, if inaccurate, may solidify into permanently auto-self-justified error never really re-explored, as an 'already-known, iron-clad' quantity/objective. (This, of course, being one of the many wonderful things about this collective – the broad scale of individual information-sharing and perspective.)

     These organisms avoid barriers, as has been established in the case of salt lines laid down; how can the purpose of travelling slime mold be determined specifically as 'recognizing itself' in stopping on self-contact to instead branch out in new food-seeking directions, rather than it simply moving around a barrier in food-seeking? The slime mold concentrates around food sources as a survival trait. Without that basic ability, it could not survive in the manner that it does. We must always bear in mind that our perceptions and interpretations are coloured – and limited – by our own experiences, expectations/desires and preconceptions, and that other explanations may be possible, including theories where basic survival traits are concerned regarding such ancient organisms. The Burgess Shale organisms were instructive also as to where our assumptions can lead us off the factual trail, which must be expected when venturing into uncertain territory. That said, this is indeed a fascinating organism.

    If we see everything in terms of 'tech uses' and human endeavours, we may miss/misinterpret what could be the most fascinating and perhaps important-to-us aspects of living organisms/historical biological development – at a time when life itself is being presented by some as disposable, in favour of technological imitations of it, said to be more efficient (at certain tasks) and therefore 'better', despite being unable to 'feel' anything or, in the case of AI, being necessarily psychopathic in terms of incapacity for the essential human species-survival characteristics of such as empathy and ethics. The appearance of life is not the same as life. This pathology mainly being successfully promoted because short-term maximized personal profit and control at all cost to others, by some also in the pursuit of a fantasized unliving immortality, is the goal for too many blinded to reality by dollar signs, and enforced by a relative few having already sucked up enough wealth to effectively purchase whole governments. This sort of amazing collective could potentially help to provide a counterbalance from the people to this, as well as the vast resource of information accumulating from this variety of human observations and minds.

  • Dorothy N. says:

    (Coming into a thread doubtless long entirely dead but, what the heck!) This particular collective (assuming this one to still be in existence) sounds incredible in a number of ways and I must say that I'm extremely impressed, in yet another number of ways, lol! (Not that I feel that we should want to 'let go' of our individual selves to become some sort of collective Borg. Slime mold and more complex life has obviously evolved differently and has different survival characteristics, needs and capabilities resulting from this.) I also hope that this collective effort toward at least the attempt at understanding this life-form will in some manner affect and help direct general society in counteracting the peculiar notion being propagated by some that tech tools are somehow 'better than life and intended to replace it', when we (ideally) create tools (including complex ones) to make life better – at least the saner among us do. While others prefer to weaponize everything, to therefore hazard everything. But what we 'see', we each interpret in our own individual/as officially-accepted and authoritatively-stated fashions – which, if inaccurate, may solidify into permanently auto-self-justified error never really re-explored, as an 'already-known, iron-clad' quantity/objective. (This, of course, being one of the many wonderful things about this collective – the broad scale of individual information-sharing and perspective.)

     These organisms avoid barriers, as has been established in the case of salt lines laid down; how can the purpose of travelling slime mold be determined specifically as 'recognizing itself' in stopping on self-contact to instead branch out in new food-seeking directions, rather than it simply moving around a barrier in food-seeking? The slime mold concentrates around food sources as a survival trait. Without that basic ability, it could not survive in the manner that it does. We must always bear in mind that our perceptions and interpretations are coloured – and limited – by our own experiences, expectations/desires and preconceptions, and that other explanations may be possible, including theories where basic survival traits are concerned regarding such ancient organisms. The Burgess Shale organisms were instructive also as to where our assumptions can lead us off the factual trail, which must be expected when venturing into uncertain territory. That said, this is indeed a fascinating organism.

    If we see everything in terms of 'tech uses' and human endeavours, we may miss/misinterpret what could be the most fascinating and perhaps important-to-us aspects of living organisms/historical biological development – at a time when life itself is being presented by some as disposable, in favour of technological imitations of it, said to be more efficient (at certain tasks) and therefore 'better', despite being unable to 'feel' anything or, in the case of AI, being necessarily psychopathic in terms of incapacity for the essential human species-survival characteristics of such as empathy and ethics. The appearance of life is not the same as life. This pathology mainly being successfully promoted because short-term maximized personal profit and control at all cost to others, by some also in the pursuit of a fantasized unliving immortality, is the goal for too many blinded to reality by dollar signs, and enforced by a relative few having already sucked up enough wealth to effectively purchase whole governments. This sort of amazing collective could potentially help to provide a counterbalance from the people to this, as well as the vast resource of information accumulating from this variety of human observations and minds.

  • Traditional lifestyle / Sgt. Couch Potato Jr says:

    The slime had replicated the Tokyo transport network..Thats the dumbest thing Ive ever heard. Maybe It was somewhat similar, and I understand why It would be but not replicated as in exactly the same. Unless her petridish had the same exact "geography" as the area around Tokyo has. Theres a huge flaud in her logic and that makes everything she says questionble. Shes a "scientist" but did a mistake not even an amateur still in school would make.

  • Gunsandrosalina Padtwo says:

    We could use this mould to create computers with biological elements for android AI.

  • ABURN Piano Covers says:

    we humans are too egocentric to admit inteligence is not only a human thing, that all nature is intelligent in its own way, and our ¨counsiusness¨ is not given by god or some external force… But in reallity we are the result of emergent properties of matter energy and cell cooperation, the result of millions of years of trial and error, every thing in nature is trial and error, and every living thing by the mere fact that they want to stay alive become intelligent

  • ABURN Piano Covers says:

    Humans are too egocentric to admit that intelligence is not just a human thing, that all nature is intelligent in its own way, and our "conscience" was not given by God or some external force … That we are actually the result of Emerging properties of energy, matter and cellular cooperation, that we are the result of millions of years of trial and error, and that every living thing by the mere fact of want to stay alive must be considered intelligent

  • Walk Wigglin says:

    ive had mine on me for 3 years oddly enough it is hardly visible anymore and as long as i keep a pair of socks on it keeps my feet free from dead skin and odor and tends to stay down there. quite recently i developed these mosquito sized literally clear jellyfish looking masses that are much faster than their previous form but the strangest thing is they flick their tongue or tail like a snake would but their movements are oddly unnoticeable at all but i do not pet animals anymore. the strangest things permissible to mention are i hardly have to dry off after a shower and ive held my breath for many seconds trying to get rid of the hiccups that came with the jelly worms and im a smoker. if my phone hadnt rang i dont think i needed to take a breath again but its a habit. a favorite cigarette trick is i pull the cherry off and crush it with my thumb and index finger to put it out with no burning at all. i ve thrown up a black golfball marble but i dont know what it followed to do it again. theres more but it has to do with a complex ability to "think big" but im still a learner in that area

  • kksheep says:

    when artist starts talking about science

  • Shoop da Whoop says:

    8:45 this is why everyone hates schools teachers always have to do some bullshit like this with students

  • Max ON says:

    амёба многоклеточная)

  • Will Horne says:

    The gasps at 4:44 are so powerful—

  • Electrum says:

    The labyrinthe experiment is intriguing. I suggest to set up controls, i.e. to carry out the same experiment with different organisms such as fungi and they preferred food to compare both behaviours.

  • binaryalgorithm says:

    So when do we uplift these suckers?

  • The Ethalon says:

    Madddness

  • Ralf Rath says:

    Physarum polycephalum sieht aus wie ein lebendes Gehirn und ist somit ein Gehirn – wenn auch primitv!

  • Notmy Name says:

    No brain only a pulse

  • UnitSe7en says:

    A lot of incorrect conclusions drawn.
    Mapping a path through a maze doesn't imply intelligence. It finds the most efficient path simply because it is the most efficient. The same applies to the railway network – It's just a mirror of efficiency. Also, it did not solve the traveling salesman problem – Mapping efficient routes between points is not the traveling salesman. The slime mould has not done advanced calculation! How it knows itself or where it has been is no mystery either – Chemical markers abound though all organisms – Even us – And their effect is more greatly apparent the simpler the organism.

    Certainly there are some interesting and mysterious aspects to slime mould, however nary but one is mentioned in this presentation! Wholesale the rest of it is utter trash. A waste of 12 minutes!

  • moosesnWoop123 says:

    We are the END

  • shannon dove says:

    Can it be geneticaly engineered to sythesize chemicals? Maybe diercted evolution? Grow it in an atomic garden and see what happens

  • M.B. says:

    For me this is a another example of consciousness running through all lifeforms. We don't develop consciousness, we tune in to it.

  • Fadal Arhab Farouk says:

    I want my own slime mold 😭

  • Anannya Paul says:

    Beauty with brains (?)

  • Pranav Pathak says:

    Slime mold was used to build metro infrastructure in Japan to find the shortest possible distance among the routes.

  • David Hartman says:

    Paul Stamets brought me here

  • dart man says:

    Hi sircastic 🍻 😂

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