Childhhood Diabetes

Childhhood Diabetes


(guitar music) – Yeah, I’m Carey Lloyd,
I’m a pediatrician and I’ve been practicing for 18 years now. (guitar music) Traditionally, diabetes in children, there’s two types of diabetes, the first is type one diabetes, where your pancreas just
really starts to fail in terms of some of the pancreatic cells fail in producing insulin. But what we’re really
concerned about right now is the type two diabetes
and over the last 30 years, something that was
virtually nonexistent was this type two diabetes in kids, and over the last 30 years,
we’ve seen it escalate. So nearly almost now,
I’m trying to remember what the statistic was,
I think it was like one in four kids are now being diagnosed with type two diabetes. We’re seeing it as young
as eight years of age. But the problem is is that
when they’re diagnosed with diabetes and it’s type two diabetes, they have had what’s called pre-diabetes prior to that for several
years, which goes undetected. They are not alone in not
knowing that they have it. 80% of the adults that have
pre-diabetes don’t know it, so their children don’t know it either. And in that pre-diabetic
state, what’s happening is the cell’s ability to take glucose into it is being hampered by inflammation. So the insulin no longer is
able to open up that cell, either a muscle cell or fat cell, to let glucose in to get
utilized and chewed up. So it sticks around in the blood vessels and causes and wreaks havoc. And so consequently then, it’s a failure of insulin to allow, it’s what
we call insulin resistance, to allow glucose in. So that’s directly related
to childhood obesity. We know that childhood
obesity has increased 100% over the last 20
years, and we’re seeing the effects of that, and
that’s this type two diabetes, it’s gonna shoot way up. Children that have type two diabetes unfortunately will shorten
their lives by 20 years. It leads towards
early-onset heart disease, kidney failure, blindness,
and the list kinda goes on and on. (guitar music) In another 15 years,
over half of Americans will have type two diabetes
or be pre-diabetic. We will not be able to afford it. Worldwide, we’re seeing by the year 2030, right now there are 290,
some odd, million people with diabetes, in 2030, there’ll be over 595 million people with type
two diabetes in the world. It’s a big problem, as
our American diet starts going global, due to industry
and profits, et cetera, we will not be able to
afford the health care costs and the sad part is that
all this is preventable if we just oftentimes,
we think about what’s on the end of our fork and
actually eat those foods that are there naturally. (guitar music) Well, we’ve seen a shift
in what we’re feeding our kids and what we’re consuming, and so, it’s directly related
to childhood obesity. And that’s what goes in their mouth, is directly related to
the increased consumption of fast foods. One statistic I saw was that
over 50% of American households eat fast foods daily, and so it’s a shift in how we see food and how we eat, and I think also a shift
in some of our lifestyle. So with the family dynamics
changing as well as popular media, we’re seeing
a slowdown in activity rates, we’re seeing increase in
supersizing, we’re seeing the change in American
family and neighborhoods. Additionally, we’re also
seeing that food costs have shifted, so with
high fructose corn syrup being so cheap, then the packaged
foods and processed foods are really quite cheap and
sometimes the only food available to some
neighborhoods and some people. So they can’t get the
vegetables and fruits, thus it’s not necessarily a choice, it’s sometimes a cultural issue as well. So unfortunately there
are a lot of dynamics that go into it, but the basic thing is we’re consuming a lot of
calories that are hidden, a lot of the wrong calories, and less of the micronutrients and good nutrients that are leading towards
childhood obesity. They like it, tastes good,
they’re advertised about it, and it’s inexpensive, it helps, it’s fast. (guitar music) Well, first there’s
generally a family history. If there’s a family history of obesity, family history of type two diabetes, then the likelihood goes up. There’s certain genetic or ethnic groups, Latino as well as African Americans, their risk for type two
diabetes is almost one in two. Then the other thing is if
your child is overweight, they’re automatically in a
high risk for type two diabetes or pre-diabetes, so you throw
family history in there, and then how you’re eating, boy, the risk goes way up and it’s
an epidemic unfortunately. Other symptoms include the
type of foods they’re eating, then you start getting into
how much obesity they have, then symptoms of
diabetes, start to include if they have high blood
pressure, if they start having increased triglycerides, LDL, HDL, their total cholesterol. We can start measuring
those, something’s called metabolic syndrome. There are physical signs on the skin that can show that you may
be in this pre-diabetic state or this insulin resistant,
you start seeing this rash, almost like dirt on the
skin in various areas. It doesn’t wash off. Those are signs of insulin resistance, so you need to look into
and be evaluated for that, this metabolic syndrome,
get the labs tested, and right now, it’s
totally preventable and in many cases, reversible. So by changing your diet, you can reverse the high blood pressure
that goes along with it, change your cholesterol
levels and start coming back down to a normal state. Your insulin starts to
work, those cells lose that resistance, and
things start functioning. It’s interesting that insulin resistance has been shown to exist within hours of eating a fatty meal. Our blood sugar goes up because
it can’t go in the cells within minutes to hours after eating fat. (guitar music) Yeah, that’s a hard question to answer, and a good one in that unfortunately, we see that now with 30%
of our children overweight, 18% are obese, and it is
hard that we’re spending millions if not billions
of dollars on trying to figure that out. The easy fix is to change your diet. That’s easier said than
done unfortunately, and as we’ve talked about,
the cost, accessibility, the desire to do so, but the biggest thing is to try to, I would recommend, try to get with someone
who can work with you, a dietician or someone who can work with changing your diet
so that then as a family, you can start making those changes that will be long-lasting,
and it’s not going on a diet. It’s actually changing your lifestyle, changing your diet in little
ways, a little bit at a time. And eventually over a year, two years, it can be reversed and
you and they will have so much better health in the long run. You’ll feel better,
you’ll have less disease, you come to see me less. That would be great. (guitar music)

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